Does anyone here use FL Studio I have an issue...

Discussion in 'Music' started by Blayz Mods, Feb 4, 2022.

  1. Blayz Mods Set The World A Blayz

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    My issue is whenever I edit a midi file and export it as a new midi file it never retains the audio it's supposed to contain, does anyone know a working method of doing this, editing a midi and re-exporting it as a midi while retaining the audio, I know Xaddgx did it once but he used synthfont, I'm more familiar with FL Studio then anything else.
     
  2. Roxas OG

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    What do you mean by retaining the audio? A MIDI contains no audio. Do you mean that after editing the notes and trying to export as a new MIDI, it exports an empty file, or it exports the same MIDI you imported in the first place?
     
  3. Blayz Mods Set The World A Blayz

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    Exports as an empty file.
     
  4. Roxas OG

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    That's annoying, I guess I'd recommend watching this vid.



    I used to use FL and exported custom MIDI plenty of times with it. I'd double check you're doing everything correctly.

    If all else fails, check out this site. You can use it to edit MIDI :D
     
  5. Topstik Moogle Assistant

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    FL Studio does not have built-in support for audio within MIDI files, so to retain the audio information in a MIDI file after editing it, you may need to use a third-party plugin or a different DAW. Here are some alternatives to consider:

    1. Load the MIDI file into a software synthesizer within FL Studio and render the output as a WAV or MP3 file
    2. Use a third-party plugin that supports audio in MIDI files, such as Kontakt or Omnisphere
    3. Use a different DAW that supports audio in MIDI files, such as Ableton Live or Logic Pro X
    Additionally, you could consider using a MIDI file format that supports audio, such as a Standard MIDI File Format 0 or 1, or a RIFF MIDI file. These formats allow for the embedding of audio samples within the MIDI file, making it possible to retain the audio information after editing.